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Local Business

Proceeds from Lemont golf outing benefit students in construction fields

Event expected to raise about $40,000 for scholarship fund

Arianna Roldan, who recently graduated from Wheeling High School, along with Dylan Subrin, who graduated from Harry D. Jacobs High School in Algonquin, were two recipients of scholarships from the Chicagoland Construction Scholarship Foundation.
Arianna Roldan, who recently graduated from Wheeling High School, along with Dylan Subrin, who graduated from Harry D. Jacobs High School in Algonquin, were two recipients of scholarships from the Chicagoland Construction Scholarship Foundation.

Proceeds from a golf outing held this summer in Lemont were used to fund the Chicagoland Construction Scholarship Foundation.

The Chicagoland AGC Golf Outing was held June 27 at Cog Hill Golf and Country Club in Lemont, according to a news release from the group. Two hundred golfers attended, and organizers expected to raise $40,000.

The scholarship foundation has awarded more than $36,000 to 70 college students working toward construction-focused degrees since the fund’s inception in 2002. One of this year’s recipients was Arianna Roldan of Wheeling High School.

Roldan was first introduced to engineering through the school’s “Project Lead the Way” course.

“Construction workers are detail-oriented, creative, motivated, hard-working and innovative,” Roldan said. “Construction encompasses all of our infrastructure demands, including hospitals, municipal work, restoration, hospitality, government projects, etc. The reality is that much of the work requires advanced skills and education, which is why construction should be thought of as a career and not just a job.”

Roldan continues to pursue engineering coursework at the University of Illinois and will intern this summer at member company Bulley and Andrews.

The 2008 recession left the construction industry with unemployed workers who never returned coupled with a generation of younger workers desiring to pursue a four-year college degree and white-collar careers, according to the release. As the Baby Boomer generation retires, a booming commercial construction market faces a severe labor shortage.

In a 2017 survey, 72 percent of Midwest contractors expressed difficulty filling labor positions, the release said.

CAGC is working to reduce the labor shortage and promote the industry as a viable and lucrative career option through the creation of the scholarship.

For more information about the scholarship, visit the CAGC website at cagc.org/scholarships or buildillinois.com to learn more about apprenticeship opportunities.

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