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Teen Driver Tips

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Cost aside, it's not a good idea for newly licensed drivers to immediately have their own cars. For one thing, you may be sending your teen a message that having a car and driving immediately is a right he or she is entitled to — rather than a privilege earned with responsible behavior and experience.   All new drivers are at the highest risk of getting into a crash during the first six months after receiving their license. 

Why wait?

  • In their first year on the road, teens are almost 10 times more likely to be in a crash.
  • Crash risk increases incrementally with each mile per hour over the speed limit.
  • 16-year-old drivers with multiple teen passengers are twice as likely to be in a crash as alcohol-impaired drivers.
  • Crashes are more common among young drivers than any other age group.  One in four crash fatalities involves someone 16-24 years old.

What car is best?

  • Avoid cars that have a sporty, performance-type image.
  • SUVs and pickup trucks are also not the best choices for teenagers, they're actually more likely to roll over in a crash.
  • Later-model mid- and full-size passenger cars are good choices since they offer sufficient weight, as well as updated safety features.
  • Small cars offer less crash protection because of their size/weight.
  • Other safety features that might benefit your teen are Electronic Stability Control (ESC) and Anti-lock Braking System (ABS), as well as intelligent seat belt reminder systems that remind drivers all occupants should wear seat belts.

Costs and responsibility

Parents can use the costs associated with driving as a bargaining point.

For example, a parent can agree to cover gas, as long as the teen adheres to the terms of a parent/teen driving agreement.

For more information about teen driver safety and tools for new drivers, visit State Farm® Teen Driver Safety website.

 

John Wright State Farm: 1050 Essington Road : Joliet, IL 60435 :815.725.5052